Liver MRI Results

As Anne mentioned in the last post, we were waiting for one final test result before moving forward with treatment: an MRI to look more closely at a possible liver lesion that had showed up on one of the previous scans. We get results from the MRI yesterday, and it’s good news: there is no evidence of any lesions in Anne’s liver! The MRI was normal, with no signs of advanced cancer, or anything of concern or note anywhere. (It is not especially sensitive and would only pick up large tumours.)

As Anne mentioned in the last post, given the extent of the primary tumor and the fact that it has metastasized, we have to assume that there are still tiny micro-metastases in her body, and for the rest of her life we’ll have to try to stay ahead of them and deal with them as they grow and show up on scans. But it is very good news that there are no visible tumors in the liver!

Our plans are the same as Anne mentioned in the last post: we’ll meet with our surgeon on June 30th, and we expect that at that time we’ll set up a date for a right hemicolectomy, probably for mid-July. Because there does not seem to be any disease in the liver, there’s a possibility that this surgery will significantly improve prognosis, since it could dramatically slow the cancer’s movement toward major organs.

Thanks to everyone for the help and support and prayers – this is a long, slow road, and we are only able to walk it because of the Lord’s help and the unflagging love you’ve shown us.

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A Proposal of a Plan

After several tests and consultations, meetings and review of the pathology (I carried slides and pieces of my appendix in my shoulder bag on the airplane, and the team here has been able to look over the work done by the lab in South Africa, as well as make their own slides), the team at Penn has come up with a proposed treatment plan for us. Continue reading “A Proposal of a Plan”

An Unexpected Test Result

Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease that causes the body’s immune system to attack the proteins that make up what we call gluten (found in wheat, barley and rye). This autoimmune attack creates a toxin that destroys the villi of the small intestine, leaving sufferers unable to properly absorb nutrients. Untreated, it can lead to (among other things) nutritional deficiencies, failure-to-thrive, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, anemia, infertility, miscarriage, kidney damage, liver failure and eventually, death. Continue reading “An Unexpected Test Result”

Questions, Answers and More Tests

The last three weeks have been filled with doctor’s appointments, trips to the lab and test after test after test as we and our medical team try to understand what we are dealing with.

There are a number of tests used to build a picture of this kind of cancer, and that’s really what I’ve learned they do – together, they are pieces of a puzzle. Each one in isolation tells us something, but on its own is usually not very useful for understanding the whole thing. This is sometimes frustrating – I want answers! Now! What is going on inside my body? What do we do about it? It is hard to be patient. It has become important to me to remember that each result we get, whether ‘good’ news or ‘bad’ news is really just one piece, best understood in the context of the whole, which we are slowly but steadily forming. Continue reading “Questions, Answers and More Tests”